Nicole Coombs

501 Defluffing the ‘fluffy’ subjects: A theoretical nursing course conversion for undergraduates

Introduction

This presentation demonstrates one way that has successfully ‘defluffed’ what could have once been considered a ‘fluffy’ subject by undergraduate nursing students – often considered less appealing or of less value compared to the clinical courses within their nursing degree.

Background

In 2016, staff at the Federation University Australia, using a new Blended Online and Digital (BOLD) curriculum,   transformed the 1st year Determinants of Health course. Teaching practices changed using the new BOLD principles, including flipped classrooms, active learning sessions and a flexible student delivery mode, as well as the introduction of regular fieldwork practicum and associated assessment tasks. Student engagement and participation in this course was rejuvenated. Students were able to apply the theoretical knowledge, from both face to face teaching and the online content, to practical tasks and assessments such as, completing foot surveys and interpreting real epidemiological data from their own communities, allowing them to see their learning in real terms. This learning scaffolds into the 2nd year Health Promotion and Illness Prevention course.

Student feedback showed the change in course delivery was well received, identified what students wanted to achieve from this foundational nursing knowledge, and how they want to see it applied for assessment. Overall, the transformation has been a joint adventure for both students and teachers, which has hopefully given this traditionally ‘fluffy’ theoretical subject a new and exciting life in undergraduate nursing education.

Key words: ‘fluffy’ subjects, fieldwork, BOLD (blended online and digital), undervalued theory

Julia Laing

1202 – Flipping first years! Flipped classrooms for novice nursing students

Introduction
This presentation will outline our students’ experiences of the use of flipped or online lecture delivery to novice first year nursing students.  Following on from literature and conference presentations around the use of this teaching method, we have used this approach to facilitate learning of foundational information in lifespan development for nurses.

Background
The idea of flipped learning has been storied, not as an experimental deviation to teaching, but as an established alternative way of learning that meets with our institution’s teaching and learning directions of being flexible and adaptable (Marshall, 2013).

Students are supported in an active, student-centred manner to apply, describe, discuss and demonstrate the learning from the flipped classroom. The aim being to confidently instil in students the value of flipped classrooms from day one so that students are able to transition from traditional classroom delivery.

As evidenced by student feedback reactions, flipped classrooms challenged students to be self-disciplined, take responsibility for their learning, and to develop study habits essential at tertiary level.

Key words: Undergraduate education; flipping learning; semester one nursing students.

Isabel Jamieson

1203 – Transitioning to being a professional: Inter-professional clinical placements for nursing and Speech and Language Therapy (SLT) students

Introduction
The intent of this research pilot project was to co-allocate Nursing and SLT students undertaking their clinical placements in an acute hospital setting so that they could work collaboratively with one patient or with a group of patients.

Method
Students were paired and placed for weekly placements over a semester. Their attitudes towards interprofessional learning and teamwork were assessed via the University of West England Entry (UWE) Level Interprofessional Questionnaire (Pollard et al., 2004) pre and post the placement. The interprofessional goals for the students were defined around case-based discussion including: how the pair communicated around the needs and goals of the patient; what tasks were completed to enable appropriate management within the team context;  what they learnt from the shared experiences that highlighted the differences between their professions and themselves as individuals.

Results
Previous research using the UWE questionnaire had shown that undergraduate students become more negative in their views towards interprofessional interactions following a clinical placement. It was hoped that by creating a formal interaction between these two professional groups, that their attitudes towards interprofessional interactions would become less negative post-placement.

Conclusion
The details of setting up the project and the findings will be the focus of this presentation with recommendations for future research.

Key words: transition; interprofessional practice; research.

Emma Collins

1204 – Creating a positive learning environment: The CAPLE project

Introduction
Health professional students describe mixed experiences of staff interactions in the clinical environment.  In response to reports of concerning levels of student harassment, the Otago Polytechnic School of Nursing and the Dunedin School of Medicine undertook a participatory action research.

Rationale
Negative experiences can be devastating for students. Literature suggests that students can doubt their career choice, fail to learn, experience stress and mental health issues.

Methodology
The CAPLE project began with a number of surveys to numerous populations. A particular clinical area was then identified within a local DHB and Phase 1 commenced. Two investigators worked closely with health care staff to improve teaching and learning through workshops and one-on-one discussion and support. Entry and exit ‘atmosphere’ interviews were also conducted.

Results
Preliminary findings indicate self-reflection from participants, and increased clarity around specific issues raised about teaching practice. The overall, positive response also contributed to a generally more positive environment for students.

Conclusion
The CAPLE project expects to see positive results over a significant period of time. Further phases are being planned to provide this data.  The well-being of students is a concern to all areas of health care in order to maintain quality of care and ensure the sustainability of the healthcare workforce.

Recommendations
Phase 2 of the project is planned for July 2017 and will include recommendations from Phase 1. This is due for completion in December 2017.

Key words:

Liz Ditzel

1205 – Using AdobeConnect in a Year 1 course: The student experience

Introduction
The purpose of this presentation is to share what we have learned about the student experience of using AdobeConnect, a web conferencing technology (WCT) in a Year 1 nursing course.

Background
For the past two years, weekly lectures have been given via AdobeConnect by a distance lecturer who also travels to campus to conduct four end-of-module group tutorials for Professional Nursing. Students (n=117) can use the device at any time or place to live-stream or listen later to recorded lectures on Moodle. Course feedback indicated the majority enjoyed this mode of teaching but many found using the technology challenging and wanted more face-to-face teaching. The lecturer also felt disconnected from students, despite using the interactive real-time features of AdobeConnect.

Results
An end-of-year online survey yielded 88 responses (75.2%). Quantitative results affirmed the learning and teaching benefits of using this technology but identified areas for improvement. From the qualitative comments it appeared that students most like using WCT because “it can be accessed from the comfort of my home; there are not as many distractions; it is easier to look things up,” and “I can revise, re-watch and have time to think!” Negative aspects were also identified.

Conclusion
These findings, clearly identifying the learning benefits and challenges of WCT for students, helped us to improve the teaching design and delivery of our course.

Key words:

Chris Gaul

1206 – Initiatives aimed at retaining ethnically diverse student nurses on undergraduate nursing programmes

Introduction
This paper presents an integrative review of the literature focusing on the ethnically diverse reasons undergraduate student nurses leave the profession before graduating. It will also outline strategies for retaining these students.

Background
Those tasked with nursing workforce planning are challenged to meet the needs of a culturally diverse and aging population at the same time that it is reported that the recruitment and retention of Bachelor of Nursing students is resulting in a trend of lower than required numbers of trained nurses. This problem is occurring both nationally and internationally.

Method
We performed an integrative review of the literature to look at strategies that could be implemented to create and retain a more culturally diverse RN workforce. Key terms to identify relevant papers lead to the selection of 17 papers for inclusion.  From these papers, four themes emerged:

  1. Prediction
  2. Recruitment and retention
  3. Single facet approach
  4. Multi-facet approach

A wide variety of different initiatives and positive outcomes were reported from various studies, but retention is a complex issue and requires further investigation.

Results
Many factors which appear to impact on student completion rates were identified. No one isolated factor can predict success across a heterogenous group of students. Implementation of a broad range of strategies from recruitment to graduation is likely to be a more successful solution to achieve higher graduation numbers amongst ethnically diverse students.

Conclusion
Supporting the recruitment and retention of ethnically diverse students is likely to assist greater numbers of Registered Nurses reach graduation and provide a more balanced workforce.

Key words:  student nurse; attrition; retention; minority.

Jean Ross & Josie Crawley

1207 – Student nurse ambassadors for healthy communities: what does community development practice look like?

Introduction
Nurses in primary health care have an opportunity to enhance community health and wellness. Primary health is central to the 2016 New Zealand Health Strategy.

Background
At Dunedin’s Otago Polytechnic we mentor student nurses to partner with a community as their client.  Student nurses advocate for their clients’ expressed health needs; engage with community resources and primary health care practitioners to promote the health of the population for which they care; manage episodes of illness, disease and life challenges by producing evidence-based strategies that are actioned by the community.  With the entire community as the client,  the student nurse requires a model and tools with which to achieve sustainable, meaningful health.

Results
This presentation endorses the importance of access to clinical practice opportunities where student nurses can build trust, respect, integrity and partnership with the community with the intention of improving opportunities for health. We will showcase student practice examples and discuss the rationale and background for engaging in community development. We will also explore the theoretical tools and models utilized dependent on community context, and the ethical processes embedded within Nursing Council of New Zealand competencies for registered nurses.

Conclusion
Transformational change has been embedded in the educational activities leading to students demonstrating their innovative practice to improve community health.

Key words:

Jayne Hartwig

1301 – Taking our first steps together: An inter-professional and inter-generational approach to transition support

Introduction
Transition to Practice Programmes (TPPP’s) are a common way of supporting new Nurses as they transition into the profession. Whilst curriculum content may vary between organisations, the key aims of TPPP’s are similar: helping the graduate nurse to navigate his or her new role.  Traditionally, our organisation has run separate TPPPs for Enrolled Nurses (EN), Registered Nurses (RN) and Registered Midwives (RM). However, transition support is also required by non-graduate staff who are transitioning to new roles or organisations.

Background
Recently our organisation began developing a combined transition support curriculum for ENs, RNs and RMs. This work involved not only a review of the curriculum content and structure, but more significantly, education and support to increase the understanding  of the transition journey amongst staff, educators and managers. At the same time, increased awareness of transition support for graduate nurses has also sparked recognition of the need for transition support amongst non-graduate staff who are transitioning within or between organisations.

Results
This presentation will outline the history of transition support at our organisation, and the highs, lows, challenges and successes of creating a transition support curriculum for all nurses and midwives regardless of whether they are graduates transitioning for the first time, or senior staff experiencing subsequent transitions.

Conclusion
Inter-professional, intergenerational  transition support can be utilised as an effective way to help individuals, build teams, create positive work cultures and maximise transition support resources to ensure a positive transition experience for all staff.

Key words: Transition; support; inter-professional; inter-generational.

 

Shannon Bakon & Sharon Ragau

1302 – Halt! Incident management: Increasing awareness of humanistic factors

Background
Humanistic factors that can contribute to errors in a hospital ward include staff experiencing hunger, anger or upset being late and tiredness or fatigue. There were 104 incidents within a general medical ward over a 2 month period. These incidents were categorised as Human Error Incidents which comprised 57.7% (n=60) of all incidents and communication/ documentation incidents 51.9% (n=54%).

Aim
The aim of this initiative was to increase nursing staff awareness of humanistic factors that contribute to errors and thereby decrease ward incident rates.

Method
Regular staff education sessions, posters, and raising the awareness of HALT (Hungry, Angry, Late, Tired) within the morning staff meeting was conducted over a two month period.

Results
The rate of incidents reduced to 71 in the following two month period. This signified a total reduction of 31.7%. Human error incidents decreased to 32.4% (n=23) of all incidents indicating a reduction of 25.3% from preceding two months. Incidents relating to communication /documentation errors reduced to 28.2% (n=20) of all incidents indicating a reduction of 22.9% from the preceding two months.

Conclusion
Raising awareness of the humanistic factors that contribute to errors can assist in reducing preventable incidents. Recognition of these factors is important in creating a safe environment and in ensuring patient safety.

Key words: Human error; Nursing, medical; incident; patient safety.

 

Leona Robertson & Phillipa Seaton

1303 – Optimising learning in interprofessional simulation programmes and sustaining simulation-based education into the future

Introduction
The presentation will highlight aspects of interprofessional simulation that optimise learning and provide a positive foundation for building simulation expertise within, and across, health care disciplines into the future.

Background
Quality healthcare is vital as this impacts on patient mortality, morbidity and health service economy. The World Health Organisation (WHO, 2010) acknowledges that collaborative interprofessional education contributes to quality care. Simulation-based education can enhance individual and team performance and is associated with safety and quality in healthcare. As educators, we must understand the elements which contribute to learning that will transfer to, and improve clinical practice. An integrative literature review explored what influenced learning opportunities in interprofessional simulated trauma scenarios. Fourteen articles were included in the review and data were synthesised utilising a thematic analysis (Braun & Clarke, 2006). Whilst the review focussed on trauma team training, the findings may be transferable to other specialties.

Results
Four main themes were identified:

  1. The utilisation of teaching and learning strategies;
  2. Preparing and focussing learners;
  3. Specific elements which contribute to effective scenario design;
  4. Utilising both specialty and team work knowledge and tools.

Conclusion
Investment must be made in providing resources and preparing interprofessional teaching teams to ensure simulation programmes are robust and follow evidence-based educational practice for optimal learning.

Key words: interprofessional; simulation; learning; education; scenarios.