Emma Collins – Poster Teaser

Teaching paediatrics to undergraduate nursing students in a bachelor of nursing programme

Introduction
In New Zealand, paediatrics is taught as a component of the Bachelor of Nursing Programme. Students graduate as comprehensive nurses, with the ability to work immediately in a paediatric setting. The Nursing Council of New Zealand sets guidelines for nursing schools to comply with when developing their curriculum. However, the teaching of paediatrics is ultimately determined by the school.

Rationale
It was unclear exactly what to teach undergraduates in regards to child health, and there were no clear guidelines in the literature as to what is taught elsewhere.

Methodology
In 2015, a curriculum mapping exercise was undertaken to determine where and when paediatrics was taught in the Bachelor of Nursing programme. Curriculum mapping allows for greater transparency within a course and can provide better allignment. This was completed using the New Zealand Child Health Nursing Knowledge and Skills Framework from the College and Youth Section (NZNO) and Plunket NZ (2014).

Results
After the exercise was completed, it was discovered that there were some areas that needed to be covered further and some aspects that were covered better than perviously thought. Since then, a robust and staircased delivery of paediatrics has been establised, keeping in line with the philosophical underpinning of the school.

Conclusion
Students now graduate with a clear and transparent introduction to paediatric nursing, and are able to articulate where and when this learning occurred.   This is transformative in that this school is preparing students well to work with children upon graduation, to meet the needs of our growing population.

Key words: Paediatrics; curriculum mapping; child health teaching; undergraduate nursing.

Wendy Blair – Poster Teaser

Nurses’ recognition and response to unsafe practice by their peers: An integrative review

Introduction

This presentation will summarise an integrative review of literature (2004 to 2014) undertaken to inform a larger mixed methods study. This review used Whittemore and Knafl’s revised framework for integrative reviews (2005) to critically examine how nurses recognise and respond to unsafe clinical practice in their peers.

Background

Unsafe nursing practice impacts on patient safety, workplaces and individuals. Despite the importance of recognising unsafe practice – including professional codes that mandate reporting – it remains unclear how registered nurses recognise behaviours and cues that constitute unsafe practice in their peers and how they respond to these situations.

Results

Nineteen articles from 15 studies were included in the review. Using a systematic integrative approach, the following four themes emerged:

Behaviours and cues for recognising unsafe practice

Nurses’ response to witnessing unsafe practice

Consequences of being reported for unsafe practice

Factors that contribute to unsafe practice

Conclusions

These Findings indicate the reasons for unsafe practice are multifactorial, with behaviours and cues that indicate unsafe practice, impacted by organisational and individual characteristics. The responses of Individual nurses are varied, and there are professional and personal costs of being reported or reporting unsafe practice. The small number of studies reviewed limits the conclusions that can be drawn. However they highlight that nurses can identify unsafe practice in their peers, and the need for further research to support identification and reporting.

Key words: unsafe practice, reporting, nursing, practice

Chris Gaul – Poster Teaser

Trials and tribulations of using technology in the classroom – Reflections from a novice!

Introduction

As the world becomes more digitally active, the use of technology in education is becoming increasingly more common. Whether it has a place in every classroom is a contentious hot topic.

Background

The use within undergraduate nursing programmes has not escaped these developments, but it is probably fair to say that anecdotally the implementation of technology has been predominately the use of simulation to replicate clinical scenarios. There are many different applications, programmes and educational software available to educators. Identifying appropriate tools, understanding their suitability and finding time to become familiar with such technologies can feel like a minefield as a novice user. In an attempt to try ‘new ways’, a journey into the world of apps and software was embarked upon!

Results

This presentation will show-case examples of different applications that have been tried and tested, with the sole aim of enhancing the learning experiences of our nursing students. These include the use of Socratives, One Note Classbook, Moodle and the increased use of digital mobile devices.

Conclusions

The benefits seen so far for the learners have been increased engagement,  development of skills for the future, and improved methods of feedback, whilst one of the benefits for educators has been reduced time marking.

Motivation, enthusaism and a willingness to extend one’s self are key skills required for these challenges.  I will share my lived experiences and offer reflections on the good, the bad and the wouldnt go there again!

Key words: technology; education; reflection.

Becky Conway – Poster Teaser

No pain, more gain: rolling out CoolSense technology with a hiccough or two

Introduction
Children in hospital experience a number of painful procedures including infusion and phlebotomy, which they find frightening and anxiety provoking. Commonly, topical anaesthetic creams are used to numb the site of injection, but these can be expensive and effectively prolong the procedure.

Background
When a Child Health service introduced a new pain numbing technology called CoolSense in one patient care unit, the feedback from children and their parents was overwhelmingly positive: more effective numbing of the injection site and reduced waiting times. In addition to this, CoolSense represented a substantial financial saving for the organisation.

Preparations were duly made to introduce CoolSense across the department. Supplies were ordered and education planned. However, following its introduction, there followed reports of skin injury and device malfunction which lead to the partial withdrawal of CoolSense.  Two areas continued to use CoolSense and log every application. No skin injury occurred during the period of logging each application.

Results
A number of mitigating factors were found to have contributed to the unsuccessful launch of CoolSense including: a broken device which was not removed from circulation; unclear understanding of skin injury; staff were overwhelmed with competing information on new technologies; in one area, the Charge Nurse was absent during implementation; the rumour-mill was rife; storage issues.

Conclusion
In our efforts to make healthcare faster, safer and more accurate we are adopting new technologies at the rate of knots. Successful implementation of even the best technologies requires more than passion. Anticipatory planning, the use of simulation, mindfulness of staff reactions to ‘new stuff’, monitoring during the bedding in phase and proper reporting are activities we need to include when introducing technology.

Key words: paediatric nursing, child health, procedural pain, technology

Kathy Trezise – Poster Teaser

Empowering student nurses’ learning in the DEU through ICT access

Introduction
The rationale for this presentation is to describe the increased student engagement in a newly formed Dedicated Education Unit (DEU) through the access to information technology. It has been widely discussed at a regional level that lack of access during the undergraduate years to technology was seen as a barrier to fully immersing the student in the clinical environment and the ability to  “walk in the shoes” of the registered nurse.
Background
The Dedicated Education Unit concept was planned to be implemented at Capital and Coast District Health board (CCDHB) in July 2016 to coincide with the pre-registration nine week clinical placement for students from Massey University and Whitireia New Zealand.  A cohort of 26 students was the ideal pilot group to test the feasibility of providing students with the same computer access as registered nurses.
It was time to walk the talk and trust the professionalism of our future colleagues with this additional responsibly and to demystify the computer applications in a District Health Board.
Results
The students embraced the responsibility with great enthusiasm fully engaging with the technology, and willingly providing feedback via survey monkey on their experiences and verbally through focus groups – “I felt like a nurse” aptly sums up the responses.
Students used the access wisely to take on-line e-learning programmes, communicate with their clinical liaison nurse and review patient diagnostic results to enhance their placement and course requirements.

Conclusion
If you are considering how to provide additional opportunities to enable the transition from student to graduate nurse role, then access to health technology is another piece of the puzzle. There should be no surprises for your graduate nurses as they enter our workforce

Key words: Student engagement; research, technology; dedicated education unit.

Adam Proverbs – Poster Teaser

Being a learner: Students’ experience of nurse lecturers during practicum

Introduction
The purpose of this presentation is to share a research project which explores student experiences of clinical lecturers during practicum. The presentation will report on data concerning student experiences of dialogue with nurse lecturers, and how learning is supported in clinical environments.

Background
Learning in clinical environments is a key aspect of the Bachelor of Nursing pre-registration programme. Nurse lecturers assist students’ knowledge acquisition in practicum to become safe nursing practitioners making informed clinical judgments. Nursing students have limited situational and ready-to-hand knowledge of how to approach clinical scenarios. Therefore, this research explores student experiences of dialogue with nurse lecturers in practicum, and how learning is supported in practicum.

Methodology
A purposive sample of three third-year nursing students from two different education providers were interviewed, with data analysed using an interpretive phenomenological approach.

Results
Being a Learner
emerged as the central theme with three sub-themes evident; experiencing the unfamiliar, being good in clinical environments, and professional sense-making. Support through dialogue with nurse lecturers provides a significant source of safety for students, especially when faced with challenging situations in practicum.

Conclusion
Nurse lecturers enhance learning opportunities by listening to student experiences and providing strategies to help students make sense of clinical situations. Lecturers encourage growth and enhance reflective skills of students using ready-to-hand clinical situational knowledge, lecturers encourage growth and enhance reflective skills of students. Education providers who prepare nurse lecturers sufficiently, enable students to feel supported and valued, therefore, allowing knowledge acquisition.

Key words: student nurse; education; clinical learning; nurse lecturer; reflection.

Kerry Davis – Poster Teaser

Supporting internationally qualified nurses – the learnings in a small private hospital

Introduction

This presentation will share the learnings of one private hospital as it prepared to support a cohort of Internationally Qualified Nurses (IQN) as they gained employment.

Rationale
The supporting literature and strategies for ongoing support will be discussed alongside the challenges that were encountered.

Conclusion
It is hoped that discussion of the adjustments required by our existing staff alongside their new IQN colleagues, will prove useful to Nurses in Education and in Practice.

Key words: supporting; internationally qualified nurses; small hospital.