Elizabeth Culverwell

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703 – Conducting training is not the goal, effective implementation is

Introduction
The purpose of this presentation is to describe the introduction of a new Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter (PICC) securement device utilising the New World Kirkpatrick model. By introducing the new securement device utilising the New World Kirkpatrick Model we hoped to ensure staff have the knowledge, skills, confidence and commitment to manage the PICCs following best practice principles.

Objectives
To successfully introduce a new securement device and evaluate the suitability of the New World Kirkpatrick model for product implementation.

Methods
Two clinical areas were chosen for the trial. We ensured all staff had achieved PICC certification. Leading indicator data was collected during the trial period and included: securement success; removal; device malfunction; time from insertion to removal; and line management. All patients with a PICC were reviewed weekly by the trial team. Staff engagement and feedback was sought and proved to be essential for on-the- job learning and desired outcomes.

Results
During the first month of the trial, there were three patient initiated PICC migrations in the trial area. For the remainder of the trial, zero PICCs migrated and there was a 100% compliance in dressing, management and care. The New World Kirkpatrick model requires a culture of monitoring, adjusting, encouraging and rewarding staff. This develops confidence and competence to meet desired outcomes.

Conclusion
The securement device was successfully introduced and nurses had the knowledge, skills, confidence and commitment to manage PICCs following best practice principles. Utilising the New World Kirkpatrick model for implementation has changed the way in which we introduced new products.

Key words: Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter (PICC); New World Kirkpatrick model.